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The ANA Masters of Marketing Conference



Held at Rosen Shingle Creek in Orlando, Florida, the ANA Masters of Marketing Conference is a gathering of the nation's chief marketing officers and leaders from the marketing industry. The conference offers opportunities to learn and engage with people who have built brands, leveraged an expanding array of media and emerging technologies, and improved the quality of marketing organizations across the board.

Some of the highlighted speakers at #ANAMasters included the CMOs from General Mills, Target, T-Mobile, Walmart, Cisco and Microsoft. Among the variety of events that took place during the conference was a forum called "Things I Wish I'd Known Then," during which Microsoft's GM of Global Advertising Kathleen Hall discussed why bigger isn't better, the importance of building relationships, and why chasing the "new" isn't always the right move. Other forums scheduled included "Putting Brand Champions at the Center of Everything You Do," as well as more market-focused panels such as "Bringing Humanity Back to Air Travel." Each of these aforementioned events took place over the course of one morning, which goes to show us just how happening this conference was. 

In fact, board members who attended the conference spent an entire day "behind closed doors," according to Adweek, discussing a number of issues that have been riddling the marketing industry, including whether agencies are receiving large rebates or kickbacks from media outlets in exchange for buying ads in large amounts. Among the considered solutions to this concern is whether the organization should hire a "fact-finding" firm to look into certain allegations of media agency fraud. Adweek contributor Lisa Granatstein (who covered the conference for the online publication) goes on to suggest that "the rebates controversy" affects marketers and agency executives alike. And with only a small number of agency execs at the conference, some "observers," as Granatstein mentions, say this lack in representation may have to do with the divisive issue at hand. All in all, the daylong discussion speaks to a collaborative effort on the part of attending board members to find a common ground.

On a more inspiring note, Bob Liodice, the president and CEO of the ANA, initiated the conference by giving a speech on the industry's efforts this year to transform the marketing landscape by leveraging emerging technologies. According to Adweek, Liodice spoke of "exploding gains in technology," and how it affects innovative media platforms and generates creativity. Among topics discussed by Liodice during his opening remarks were "advances in multi-screen platforms and integrated programs, efficient programmatic media strategies, real-time marketing, outdoor digitally-based placed media and connected TV."

Liodice even mentioned the second annual Marketing Disruption Study, a collaboration of the ANA and McKinsey & Co. Most notably, however, was that Liodice emphasized the need for the industry to come together to fight ad blocking, which he believes "represents consumers outrage over substantially diminished user experience." Liodice, a self-proclaimed "true believer" that "marketing can make a difference," denounced, among the list of industry grievances, "page clutter, lengthy video pre-rolls and long load times."

In light of these deficiencies, Ad Exchanger claims marketers are relinquishing their strict control over messages in order to better associate their brand with positivity. Be it a quick laugh or paying it forward by buying a stranger a meal, marketers are increasingly switching out that firm ground of data and measurement in favor of risk-taking and experiential efforts that leverage the emotions of the consumer through, for example, empathy. Arby's Chief Marketing Officer Robert Lynch calls this marketing behavior "being authentic to a fault", because although it's a risk to not rely on metrics, experiential marketing provides more opportunities to reinforce a brand's core beliefs, which makes for better marketing and a more satisfying consumer experience.

No matter the challenges the marketing industry has had to face (or continues to face), to return to the concerns of the president and CEO of the ANA, Liodice boldly closed his opening statement at the conference with an acknowledgement of real opportunities for positive change. Ultimately, Liodice highlighted a shift in marketing that began with the tried-and-true metrics, and has moved toward the more unchartered waters of consumer experience and service-oriented marketing.

This post was written by current Renegade intern Sam Oriach. You can follow him on Twitter @samoriach.

Co-Operative Insurance Develops Unique Interactive Social Media Campaign


Research from The Co-Operative Insurance has revealed that four in five drivers associate their first set of wheels with fond memories of the past. According to the report, over 69% of  respondents love to ‘car-oke,’ and sing along to music in their cars.

Capitalizing on these findings, The Co-Operative Insurance launched its biggest social media campaign on September 14th, called “Nostalgia FM.” Nostalgia FM is a musical flashback to when you passed your driving test. It prompts users to enter the month and year they passed, which then creates a playlist of hit tunes during that time. 

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How does it work?

  • Users type in the date they passed their test to get a list of tracks that were popular around that time. 
  • Users are then prompted to share their results on social media, or listen to the tracks on Spotify. 

Over the course of 5 days, the interactive tool welcomed 200,000 engagements on Twitter and Facebook (which includes likes, comments, views, re-tweets and favorites). In only 24 hours, The Co-Operative Insurance’s twitter followers increased by 6%. The conversation surrounding the campaign  surpassed twitter’s 1.5% barometer for engagement, reaching a figure of 5.3%. The campaign also successfully captured the attention of celebrities, including Vanessa Feltz and Lisa Snowdon. The impressive success of the campaign highlights the fact that social media is playing a pivotal role in The Co-Operative Insurance’s marketing and customer offering strategy. According to the company’s Director of Marketing, Charles Offord, "We will build on the success of this campaign to continue to engage with our customers and members in new and appealing ways.”

The campaign has two key virtues – the web page loads quickly, and it gives people the opportunity to listen to the playlist via a preinstalled app or a default web player. The musical jukebox harbors 650 individual spotify playlists to cover 55 years between 1960-2015, with over 1,600 songs. Overall, the campaign is a great way to get their brand name out there by creatively engaging with their customers. 

This post was written by Renegade intern Ria Doshi. 

Advertising Week – New York, 2015: Roundup & Takeaways


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                                                                                                                                                                             Photo courtesy of NYSE.

This year, the world’s premier gathering of marketing and communications leaders saw its 12th year in New York, and hosted more than 290 events, 95,000 attendees, 246 seminars and workshops, 10,100 delegates and 902 speakers.

Drawing from brand, agency, technology, startup, media and broader cultural communities, Advertising Week is a weeklong assembly of the industry’s best and brightest thought leaders. With dedicated forums for elite brand marketers and creative visionaries looking for an immersive and accessible experience, Ad Week generates excitement about the advertising industry, and provides a positive platform for the growth and nurturing of successful talent.

Among the most anticipated things executives hoped to gain from Ad Week was networking with fellow industry leaders. However, networking wasn’t the only perk attendees were looking forward to. According to this article from Ad Age, leaders like Gian LaVecchia, MEC’s Managing Partner of Digital Content Marketing for North America, were concerned about the ever-changing role of the CMO as the marketing environment becomes more turbulent due to emerging technologies. Additionally, Chief Marketing Officer of NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises Jackie Hernandez was excited to find out how consumer consumption and technology are converging, and how marketers are looking to reach consumers in this evolution.

Hopes and wishes aside, Ad Week attendees quickly learned that the panels weren’t all flowers and daisies. One executive claims Ad Week isn’t about advertising anymore, but more about general creativity. R/GA’s Global Chief Creative Officer Nick Law expressed deep concern during a panel last week, in which he said, “It’s pretty hard to be an agency right now.” Law says the difficulties are partly due to startups disrupting the industry, affecting clients and going after talent.

Adding to the laundry list of concerns for the future of the advertising industry, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong said during a panel, “Advertising is going to get exponentially more expensive.” According to Ad Age, the increase in costs is occurring because every time e-commerce makes another purchase routine, it gets that much harder for marketers to tempt consumers into a switch. Not to mention the ad block crisis taking the Internet by storm, especially among the younger generation.

As if responding to similar worries for how ad agencies are faring in today’s marketing climate, Facebook’s CEO Gary Briggs said during a panel last Thursday that he’s giving his in-house creative team more work. What this means is that Facebook is taking more of its advertising jobs in-house, presumably for reasons having to do with expertise, trust and compatibility, since the role of the CMO is evolving to encompass more technology than creativity.

Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg also said in a panel last Tuesday that advertising on the social network’s Messenger app is in the very early experimentation stage, meaning Facebook is bringing ads to the chat room!

But not all happenings from this year’s Advertising Week were as deeply concerning as some of the comments made by industry executives.

Instagram’s Director of Brand Development Daniel Habashi made breakthroughs regarding the photo-sharing app’s affect on consumer marketing. As the industry adjusts to the shift to mobile, Habashi noted during a panel that it makes sense for marketers to push out content on Instagram because people use the app on average one out of every five minutes on their mobile devices.

On a slightly more inspiring note, GLAAD, the organization dedicated to positive representation of the LGBT community in areas such as entertainment, marketing and advertising, recognized the best LGBT advertisements during a panel last week. The panels included representatives from DirectTV, Tylenol, Target, Wells Fargo and Google Talk.


  • The role of the CMO is evolving
  • Technology is changing the marketing landscape
  • Consumer marketing and technology are converging
  • It’s hard out there for agencies
  • Advertising is going to get more expensive
  • Facebook is taking advertising jobs in-house
  • Facebook might bring ads to Messages
  • Instagram is a strong influencer of consumer marketing
  • Diversity in the industry is being recognized

 This post was written by current Renegade intern Sam Oriach. You can follow him on Twitter @samoriach.

Swarm App by Foursquare Transforms Mobile Users into Influencers


In May 2014, Foursquare released Swarm, an app that allows users to check into locations and follow their friends' activities.

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It should be. In fact, most initial reactions to the release of Swarm were that of frustration as users realized the app's functions mirrored those of the original Foursquare many had grown to love. Yet, according to International Business Insider, Foursquare's split made sense because only one in twenty consumers were using the original app for both check-ins and search. Consequently, Swarm became the product of an app unbundling process by Foursquare, similar to how Facebook unbundled its mobile into single platforms such as Messenger and Groups. So, while Foursquare focused on developing one main service: personalized, local search, Swarm became the place to check-in and follow your friends.

So, we ask ourselves, why is Swarm ranked 174th in the App Store and why are people angry about it looking exactly like the original Foursquare?

I believe that the primary reason why the app is not as popular as one would expect is that there simply is a lack of knowledge about Swarm and Foursquare's “app unbundling” process.

Let's start with Swarm’s uses:

  • Check in to earn prizes and compete with friends to see who's having the best week on the leaderboard
  • Try to earn the Mayor title at your favorite spots by checking in every time you visit
  • Keep track of where you've been and who've you hung out with
  • See who's hanging out nearby
  • Send a message to your friends to make plans to meet up

Sounds fun, right? To echo the Swarm's description in the App Store, "Swarm turns every day into a game!" So even when you are eating your usual meal at your favorite local restaurant, you don't feel an overwhelming sense of ordinariness. With Swarm, you’re playing a game and, "the usual," with its feelings of stillness and bore, suddenly becomes spontaneous and full of life. To a Millennial generation of mobile users who have been described as apathetic in the past - but who have learned that emotions are the future of technology - Swarm redefines social media as a way of living, where emotions are generated through movement and gamification, instead of just being expressed or represented.

I spoke with one of Foursquare's marketing interns about why she loves Swarm. Here's what she had to say:

I like Swarm because it's fun to keep a record of the places I visit, and because I love to see where my friends are and have been. It's especially awesome when you check in somewhere and see that your friend is at a venue nearby. With Swarm, you can actually arrange a run-in with them.

Hearing this, I understood her point. And then, as though reading our mind, she added:

And of course I love it because it keeps a record of the places I've been to in my Foursquare app, as well, so that I won't forget to rate places or leave tips. I can also use Swarm to share my experience with the Foursquare community.

What I got from this explanation is that yes, Swarm is an unpopular stand-alone app, but it was specifically made to complement your Foursquare experience, not be its own thing. When you check in on Swarm, Foursquare reminds you to rate the place you visited and provide a tip. And because it is the primary means through which you check in, Swarm enhances networking among Foursquare's community of users.

However, the two diverge as a result of gamification, the main difference between Swarm and the original Foursquare. Furthermore, as Swarm users collects coins, stickers, prizes and Mayorships (previously a Foursquare feature), the more they start to represent actual capital, and in an even stranger way, the establishments they visit. So, as much as Swarm generates fun and games, winners and losers, leaders and followers, the app actually extracts value from a user's consumer experience instead of simply identifying a user’s desired location as Foursquare does with its personalized searches. 

This reading of Swarm's user experience adds a branding aspect to Swarm that Foursquare lacks, where users actually become live, branded social content that people consume. In other words, Swarm is a marketing haven because it exposes users to previously unknown businesses by allowing them to create and follow a network of friends. In this way, each user is an influencer. I would go so far as to conjecture that the app's gamifying features (i.e. the leaderboard) actually drive sales and increase customer conversion rates because it makes the user want to check in and reap their rewards. Thus, in reaching previously untapped audiences, small businesses without developed social strategies could benefit from Swarm's potential for user-generated content marketing the most.

What I’ve learned is that the Foursquare/Swarm split wasn't just an app unbundling process, but a strategic redistribution (followed by an enhancement) of services that became exclusive to Swarm, yet continued to supplement Foursquare. All the while, Swarm was built to visually resemble the original Foursquare app, while being successful enough as a stand-alone app. And this is ultimately why Swarm is unpopular, because it's seen as Foursquare's past self, ugly sibling or fierce competitor; when in reality it's Foursquare's gamifying descendent, doing what its role model should have done for users and businesses from the start (and doing it really well), even if mobile users don’t see what I see quite yet…

This post was written by current Renegade intern Sam Oriach. You can follow him on Twitter @samoriach.

Choose Your Own Adventure––BBQ Style––with New Wendy’s Video Ads


We recently heard about Wendy's newest campaign that advertises the return of the BBQ Pulled Pork Sandwich and BBQ Pulled Pork Cheese Fries. Titled "Crack the Masters," the campaign by VML, a full service digital marketing and advertising agency, features a series of online videos that link to one another and transform the consumer’s experience of the advertisement into a game that almost anyone with Internet access can play. 

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According to Ketchum, the marketing agency that came up with the campaign, “Crack the Masters” sprung out of the realization that pitmasters will do anything to hide any secrets that might give away their own recipes for successful barbecued meat. In acknowledgement of this hurdle, the Wendy's team conducted extensive research by attending BBQ festivals and visiting the best BBQ joints in America. This has proven to be no easy task, however. And now, Wendy’s is asking for your help.

The interactive game follows a "choose your own adventure" format that lets you pick one master out of the three presented in the initial video (sauce, smoke and "hip") from whom you wish to intercept information. 

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But, that's not all.

Users watch a series of videos that feature some of the nation's master BBQ chefs (or so they appear) and try to pull out some of the "meatiest" secrets by reading each master's ego and personality. This, in effect, helps you decide how to respond to them. If you press a little, you might find out some secrets that go beyond Wendy's products and actually teach you helpful tips on how to make real, good BBQ. For example, you might learn what type of wood works the best for slow-cooking pork shoulder.

When I played the game, I chose to “press a little," and so as a result, I learned that some BBQ masters put coffee in their sauces. Helpful tip! Reminds me of when I learned that some people pour beer and powdered cinnamon into their chili.

To play "Crack the Masters" and learn more about Wendy's and the return of their beloved BBQ products, visit Wendy's official YouTube channel. I'll be pretending to dip my fries in cheese sauce.  

This post was written by current Renegade intern Sam Oriach. You can follow him on Twitter @samoriach.

Important Takeaways from Instagram's Newest Features


This week, I've been thinking quite a lot about Instagram. And you probably have been, too, due to the large amount of buzz the photo-sharing app has been getting lately. These mentions across multiple online news channels aren't for naught, however. Instagram has actually pushed out a number of updates in the form of new features. And they have been doing so concurrently with the expansion of their ad business, which raises questions about how the timing of the launches of these new features correlates with that expansion. In this blog post, I will outline those enhancements I find most noteworthy, provide my two cents on each and end with an assessment of how these changes relate to the expansion of Instagram's ad business.

Horizontal and Vertical Posts 
AT LAST! The square photo format, once required, has been abandoned, thrown to the wolves and left behind. At least, that's what we thought would happen. But if you scroll down through your feed, you'll note that for the most part, ads continue to follow the square format of yesteryear, despite Instagram's watershed moment. And much more disappointing is that your followers (yes, those people whose posts you like and whom you message from time to time) are not actually embracing the new change as often as you thought they would.

It's as if we have gotten used to Instagram's restrictions, complacent with its rigid structure and happy with what we had been graciously given: photo-editing tools that lacked the option of changing the orientation and size of our posts. For so long, we felt like we were in full control of how we displayed our Instagram content. And now that we have the complete package and the door to self-expression has widened just a little bit more, we aren't using it!

 Whether this is an issue relating to our familiarity with the square format or Instagram’s almost “parental” control is something I can't quite put my finger on yet. It seems like everyone I follow, and of course I, too, still needs some time for adjusting. Maybe then we'll feel comfortable abandoning InstaSize for the unfamiliar freedom of Instagram's new image orientation feature.

“Send To” 
This new feature was actually the one I was most enthusiastic about. For years, we have been tagging our friends in comments on posts we find particularly relevant to them or just plain funny. Scrolling down our feeds, we can see hundreds, even thousands of comments, each with a handle or two followed by a laugh-cry emoji. We shamelessly add to these threads ourselves, not thinking of the amount of notifications the photo’s owner will receive as a result of our thirst for (over)sharing. And so, pretty soon, the tendency to over-share via the act of tagging your friends in comments produces what I read as an aberration on content that actually hinders the natural flow of our feed intake. 

This, of course, presented a problem to the team at Instagram, one that they "fixed" with a new option now placed below every post alongside the "like" and "comment" icons. The solution allows you to directly send posts to users without having to comment. Not only does this eliminate the necessity for, say, embarrassingly posting a flirtatious comment (along with a friend's handle) on James Franco's most recent selfie, but it also encourages conversation within Instagram's newly developed direct messaging feature.

Direct Messaging
First of all, thank you Instagram for making emojis BIG AND BEAUTIFUL! Excuse my seemingly random excitement, but as a result of the expansion of Instagram's direct messaging feature, we can now note each emoji's unique characteristics. I mean… did you know that the rabbit has red eyes?

The optical trait of each emoji isn’t the only good thing worth noting about the newly embellished direct messaging feature. The main benefit is the ability to view direct messages as a continuous thread, rather than a series of comments to an image shared with multiple people. In other words, you can send a post from your feed to a friend, after which direct messaging becomes more like Facebook Messenger in the ways you interact with others: your messages are highlighted in blue while the others are gray, similar to iMessages on your iPhone and Mac. More than just an attempt at pushing Facebook Messenger out from its #1 spot as the most downloaded app, the newly expanded direct messaging feature has the effect of killing two birds with one stone. And I think that's pretty rad of Instagram, considering Facebook's already-established dominance in the social networking circuit. 

My Assessment
These updates seem to be more of a late response to existing issues and concerns about Instagram's user experience rather than expansions to boost its ad business development. However, I would argue that these recent developments in the app’s features are indeed Instagram's attempt to look good to marketers and bring in business. This is to say that while Instagram has become more user-friendly, the app as a product has also become more marketable and attractive to marketers looking to spend money on advertisements. Ultimately, by smoothing out the interface’s quirks and boosting revenue, Instagram can cover the costs of product development while:

  1. Expanding its ad business.
  2. Making the app more user-friendly.
  3. Improving its brand’s online presence.

All in all, I consider this to be very successful marketing. Not bad, Instagram!


This post was written by current Renegade intern Sam Oriach. You can follow him on Twitter @samoriach.

Social News Roundup | July 10, 2015


1. When to Post to Facebook and Twitter for Maximum Responses


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Klout and Lithium Technologies found that maximum engagement for Twitter and Facebook is between 7 and 8 p.m. Discover more social media posting strategies in this SocialTimes piece.


2. Visual Media Changes How Humans Consume Information (Infographic)


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Humans are processing information differently with an increase in consumption of visual media. For example, 81% of people skim articles instead of reading them online. Find out how brands should evolve in this infographic.

3. 4 Recommendations (and 1 Calculation) to Improve Social Media Engagement


Photo courtesy of SocialTimes

One way to improve your brand’s social media engagement is to have a deeper understanding of your audience. Check out the other ways here.

4. Facebook’s New Floating Video Feature Lets You Scroll While You Watch


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As if our attention spans weren’t already too short, Facebook now lets you watch videos while you peruse your newsfeed. Find out the full scoop on Mashable.

5. 10 Characteristics of Killer Twitter CTAs You Can Use Today


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Including a call-to-action (CTA) in your tweet can help your brand increase engagement with its audience. Discover  ten attributes to keep in mind when prompting your target to take action.

6. Mobile Draws Stronger Neurological Responses Than TV (Study)


Photo courtesy of SocialTimes

A recent study by Facebook IQ and agency SalesBrain showed that our proximity to the mobile screen makes us more attentive than when watching TV. Check out this and other key takeaways for marketers here.

Social News Roundup | June 19, 2015


1. Study: Facebook Posts to Brands’ Pages Fall on Deaf Ears

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Photo courtesy of Social Times

87 percent of posts to brands’ Facebook pages go unanswered. Active pages responded to only 37 percent of posts to their page. Find out more about what page administrators should do here.


2. How to Improve Organic Reach on Facebook (Infographic)

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Photo courtesy of Social Times

There has been a consistent decline in organic reach for brands on Facebook. Social Times offers some possible solutions. 


3. Social Media is Stuck in the Workplace Friend Zone (Infographic)

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Photo courtesy of Social Times

Most people see social media as a useful way to keep in touch with friends. Its reputation as a distraction keeps social media from becoming valuable in the workplace. See the full infographic

4. Pinterest Unveils Smarter Search Feature and Verified Accounts

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Photo courtesy of Social Times

Pinterest users can now see what topics are trending on the platform. Additionally, brands can become verified with a red check mark so that users know that their pages are legitimate. Find out more here.  


5. Twitter to Advertisers: 100% Viewability on Autoplay Videos- Or It’s Free!

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Photo courtesy of Social Times

Twitter will only charge advertisers for videos if they have been watched for at least three seconds and are fully in view on the device. As users scroll through the Twitter feed, native videos or GIFs will play automatically, but sound will only play when the users taps on the video. Learn more here.


6. Here Are the 12 Best Facebook Marketing Campaigns From the Past Year

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Check out this year’s most successful social campaigns on Facebook, including the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge and Always’ #LikeAGirl.

Taking Over Advertising Ten Seconds at a Time


With all of the different platforms and outlets we can now access, our attention spans are getting shorter and shorter. Wait, what were we just talking about?

Snapchat hopes to capitalize on the limited attention span of its 13-34 year old audience by advertising to its 100 million daily users in under 10 seconds. Yet with the introduction of advertising on the platform, many marketers are beginning to question its potential effectiveness.

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Snapchat, an app that allows you to send pictures to friends for a set amount of time, has taken off in the last four years.  The platform, created by Evan Spiegel and his fraternity brother at Stanford, now has 100 million daily users and is valued at more than $15 billion. Inherently, the app is not just for sharing selfies for five seconds, but is a way for friends to communicate where they are and what they’re doing.

Snapchat as a means to advertise

In terms of what advertising on Snapchat would actually look like, the platform has multiple ways for brands to share their messages. Geofilters, or location-specific overlays, allow users to easily share where they are. Numerous airports nationwide, big cities and even small towns have geofilters that are accessible to users in that location. Recently, companies like McDonald’s have created a geofilter for Snapchatters to use while at their establishment. A Snapchatter can then send this picture to friends, or even share it to all friends at once by adding it to “My story.”

The app has special live stories, where users at a certain sporting event, music festival, or even college campus can add their own pictures and share with thousands of viewers in the same region. After the Warriors won game six of the 2015 NBA Finals, a special live story called “Warriors Win It” could be viewed nationwide.

Additionally, the app has a “Discover” section where eleven brands, including Cosmopolitan, People, ESPN and National Geographic, can share short articles and visual content. Cosmopolitan, for example, has featured sponsored content from Maybelline and reaches 1.82 million users a day. The content shared by these big media brands creates a unique, interactive experience, specifically for mobile, that is curated for short attention spans.

Spiegel has also discussed the importance of “thinking vertically” when it comes to creating ads for Snapchat. He emphasized that viewers are nine times more likely to watch a complete video if it is vertically oriented and takes up the entire mobile screen.


Some pitfalls

While many brands wish to stay ahead of the curve and explore Snapchat as an advertising option, many others believe that there are too many issues with the platform as a means of advertising.

Snapchat initially over-gauged advertising interest and wanted to charge $750,000 for a 24-hour campaign. The price has now dropped to 2 cents per view, or $20 per 1,000 views. When the “Discover” page first came out, the content was extremely popular. This has since dropped off; however, the page is still a way to reach a mass audience on the platform.

Many marketers are skeptical of advertising on a platform that has not been widely tested and is extremely hard to target and track. Snapchat is designed with anonymity in mind, the complete opposite of what most marketers want: campaigns with very visible targets.

Snapchat’s unique layout would force brands to create specific content for the app, which could not be reused on other advertising mediums. Advertisers question whether the platform is worth the energy and money.

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Photo courtesy of LA Times


Young audiences have gone mobile

The bottom line: Snapchat utilizes word-of-mouth in a whole new way and targets a young audience. Word-of-mouth is at the core of most campaigns and is vital for the success of a brand. Introducing this type of word-of-mouth campaign encourages brands to think differently, explore the world of mobile marketing and tap into a young target.

This app has the potential to be a successful advertising platform, contingent on carrying out Spiegel’s idea: that if marketers integrate ad content into the system of Snapchat, it will no longer seem like a burden to consumers. But will brands want to create the content? Will Snapchat be able to prove itself as a viable option in comparison to other platforms, like Facebook and Instagram? Or will others follow in the footsteps of McDonald’s, BudLight, Coca-Cola and Macy’s and try out Snapchat advertising?

Social News Roundup | May 29, 2015


1) Not one brand ranks in the Top 100 for YouTube

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Image courtesy of Adweek

Native YouTube creators have loyal followings most brands can only dream of. To keep from falling too far behind, brands should take note of the tips found here... 


2) When it comes to Facebook, timing is everything


Image courtesy of SocialTimes

50% of all likes, comments, and shares will be posted in the first 60 minutes. Posting at night will get you the most of all three. For the exact hour, click here... 


3) The good and the bad of encouraging employees to be brand advocates. 

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Image courtesy of Adweek

Employees can be your biggest and best brand advocates. On the flip side, they might have arguments on social media with your company prominently attached to their profile. You can find both sides of the argument here... 


4) No surprise here – Brands focus the majority of their efforts on Facebook.

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Image courtesy of SocialTimes

Facebook is still the most heavily used social network in the world, capturing over 30% of world social marketing spend. Find the full article here... 


5) Ever receive a message and have no idea who it’s from? 


Image courtesy of Adweek

Facebook has got your back with some contextual info. The social media network will now give you pertinent information on how you might know the person in question. Click here for the full article. 

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